Coal Age

OCT 2018

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32 www.coalage.com October 2018 ventilation control continued Coming to America: Reversible Axial Flow Fans In Q1 2018, Longwall Mining Services (LMS) entered a dis- tributorship agreement with CFE Technology GmbH, head- quartered in Zweibr├╝cken, Germany. Under it, LMS will be the North American mining and power generation sector vendor of CFE's entire line of fan technology, according to Bryon Cerklefskie, LMS vice president, sales and marketing. The agreement expanded LMS's portfolio of offerings and brings to the North American coal mining market tech- nologies and solutions competitive to those already avail- able, Cerklefskie said. "This rounded out our ability as a company to supply anything from small baby fans up to the biggest of big fans," he said. "They've got fan technology that seems to be little bit more advanced than what other companies have." For example, CFE's high-capacity axial-flow fans with in- flight variable pitch control can be put into reverse at the push of a button, Cerklefskie said. "You don't have to stop it all the way and adjust blades," he said. Once in reverse, the fans operate at the desired specifica- tions, Cerklefskie said. "These are highly efficient in reverse, which has to do with how the blade profile is formed," he said. Norbert Kuhn, managing director, CFE, said the company's reversible mine fans "offer the highest efficiencies for forward and reversed operation." Push-button reversibility, "which allows changing the pitch angle of the blade by more than 180┬░," is made possible by "hy- draulic adjustment," CFE reported. The blades can be adjusted in mid-operation or at standstill. The solution is designed "to save human life in case of fire, explosion and firedamp in un- derground mines." The fans can be made of cast aluminum, CFE reported. They feature horizontally split housing to provide ease of main- tenance and accessibility. The blade shafts and main bearings are designed to extend maintenance intervals. Thus, the fans present only moderate capital costs, and generate low energy and maintenance costs, CFE reported. Beyond axial flow fans, CFE manufactures absorption si- lencers, acoustic insulation and lagging for use in underground exhaust fan systems. The perforated baffle silencer is customized to the applica- tion. "Designed to provide the requested attenuation at min- imized pressure drop, this silencer is appropriate for a wide range of sizes and volumes," CFE reported. " Acoustic insulation and lagging, which softens the noise from fan casings and ductwork, can also be custom ordered. "The required dampening is considered individually for each application and may include additional acoustic material thickness or anti-drumming foil for more stringent require- ments," CFE reported. CFE's solutions can be for greenfield, brownfield and retrofit projects. The agreement situates CFE to penetrate markets previously closed to them due to economic condi- tions or the posture of the players already in the market, Cerklefskie said. "They've had a hard time cracking into our market," he said. With the typical ventilation project be- ing plotted and contracted out several years ahead of

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